Walk Heroes and How You Help

Every year, the Epilepsy Foundation's National Walk for Epilepsy grows in size, scope and significance - thanks to dedicated people like you. The Walk is the preeminent event where the epilepsy community comes together in Washington, DC to show the world the importance of raising much needed funds and awareness about epilepsy.

The money raised from the National Walk for Epilepsy helps the Foundation provide services for people living with epilepsy, provide awareness programs for proper seizure recognition and first aid, provide a voice to make sure health care options for people living with seizures remain strong, and provide much needed research funding toward better treatment options and ultimately a cure.

By coming to the National Walk for Epilepsy, you are supporting nearly 3 million Americans who live with seizures every day as well as their friends and loved ones.

By coming to the National Walk for Epilepsy, you are helping support new and innovative research that leads to exciting treatment options like a new form of intravenous anti-epilepsy medication that shows great promise in helping infants born with seizures.

By coming to the National Walk for Epilepsy, you are helping support advocacy efforts that are making sure people with epilepsy are not discriminated against and that national health care reform properly covers people with seizures.

By coming to the National Walk for Epilepsy, you are helping provide programs to educate first responders around the country about how to identify seizures from behaviors that could be a result of drugs or alcohol

And by coming to the National Walk for Epilepsy, you are united with thousands of caring and compassionate people like yourself.

See How "Walk Hero" Sereen's Dream Team Helps

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Sereen's Dream Team has been at every Walk since the beginning.  Sereen (front, second from left) is 7 years old and comes with her family from Manassas, Va.  Her mother, Dena Hammad, said, "It's such a boost of confidence for her.  She comes and she knows this day is for her.  Every day is a struggle with her delays and disabilities.  To have this one day where she can feel somewhat normal and special is really important."